“All the while they keep Sabbath, they are in fact, in their imaginations, buying and selling and trading and bargaining.  The appearance is one of rest, but, says the poet, the social reality is one of restlessness, for the pattern of acquisitiveness is not interrupted, even on the day of rest.”  Walter Brueggemann is writing about the ancient Jews (in Sabbath As Resistance), but might this description of a culture of unfulfilling leisure apply to us as well?  What does it mean to rest in ways that bring wholeness?

Read "Practically Whole" from Joe Heikman

Do you need time to rest and let your soul catch up? Wendy Eisler shares about her recent camping trip and the lessons she learned about taking rest and Sabbath. This is a continuation of our Sabbath Series this fall. 

Read her sermon here.

For most Christians, the word "Sabbath" triggers thoughts of Sunday routines like church attendance, family meals, etc.  And for some of us, it also brings a tinge of guilt over prohibitions against working or shopping or various other activities that we or our parents or grandparents used to keep religiously but now often slide away in the face of current priorities and realities.  Is that what Sabbath is all about?  Where did the idea come from and what might it mean to renew our Sabbath practices today?

Read The God Who Rests from Joe Heikman--and stay tuned for the rest of the series throughout September.

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When

Sunday Mornings
10:15 a.m. Zoom Fellowship Time
10:45 a.m. Zoom Worship

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Pastor Joe Heikman
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Pastor Eileen Klaassen
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